You guys all know I’m only in this for the money, right?

Volunteering. Psh. Not paid, not worth it.

Kidding. I was thinking about the role of money in creating great works. Do you have to be motivated by payment to write an awesome story? Of course not. But is it an influence? Continue reading “You guys all know I’m only in this for the money, right?”

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Batman says Stay Away from Cliches…Like the Dead Parents Plot Point

So we might be teaching the kids about cliches this year. I’m glad to say we don’t hear a lot of cliched phrases or plot points in the Den meeting room, but in case you get tempted, here’s 10 tips to avoid cliches from Writer’s Digest. I’ve cut it down to the important points, but you can find the link to the full article at the bottom. Continue reading “Batman says Stay Away from Cliches…Like the Dead Parents Plot Point”

Music and Writing

Whenever I’m having trouble trying to find the words for my story, I do one of two things:

  1. I shave my legs
  2. I listen to music

Both work. Miraculously. As soon as my legs are smooth/patch worked with razor cuts or as soon as I’m plugged into music, the words suddenly start flowing out of me again. Writer’s block instantly gone.

Since I’m not really keen on spending a whole blog post talking about the art of leg shaving (which I have not yet perfected—I can never really get all the little hairs off of those pesky knees), I’m going to tell you a couple of ways I use music to write. And maybe it’ll help you…maybe.

Continue reading “Music and Writing”

How Screenwriting Made Me a Better Novelist

Now, I’ll have to admit, when I was first introduced to screenplays, I thought they were pretty lame. All dialogue. Almost no description. The page looked practically naked. Empty. Without the stylistic adornments and embellishments of fine literature. I turned up my snooty nose, tossing page upon page of screenplay away, swearing that I would only ever write novels.

Now, several years later, after writing a few screenplays of my own and gaining a little bit more maturity (I hope), I’ve come to realize that screenwriting and novel writing are not that different. Readers, after all, are just like a movie audience: they’re both sitting there expecting a story to be told to them. The only difference is that readers experience the story playing out inside their heads instead of up on the big screen.

Recently, then, I’ve been approaching my novels in a cinematic way. And I can’t tell you how much I think my writing has improved. Here are just a few of the lessons that I learnt about novel writing from screenwriting.

Continue reading “How Screenwriting Made Me a Better Novelist”